Perfect Picture Book: CLICK, CLACK, MOO

Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type

“Farmer Brown has a problem.
His cows like to type.
All day long he hears
Click, clack, moo.
Click, clack, moo.
Clickety, clack, moo.”

Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type is just one of those fun books that every child should read, and here’s why:

1. It teaches history: “A typewriter? What’s that? Why didn’t the cows just text the farmer?”
2. It teaches cooperation, negotiation, and politics: “So it’s like when I want candy, and you’re mean like the farmer and say no? I’m going on strike, too.”
3. It’s fun to say moo: “Moooooooo!”

In all seriousness, if you can be serious about typing cows, the book is great. It has a repetitive phrase for kids to repeat that makes the book an interactive experience. Even on the first reading, the kids will be clicking, clacking, and mooing along with you. The illustrations are subtly comical through the thoughtful and earnest expressions of the cows. Plus, all the notes between Farmer Brown and the cows are seamlessly worked into the illustrations. Overall, Click, Clack, Moo highlights the importance of reading, communication, and can get children thinking about different ways that messages can be delivered.

Find Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type at Amazon
Find Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type at IndieBound

Resources:

PBS Kids! has lesson plans, games and activities, as well as video versions of the story featuring American Sign Language and Signing Exact English interpreters. Please note: You’ll need to download the videos before watching because they’re not streamed.

Read Write Think has a comprehensive six-session lesson plan on vocabulary and word families.

Bibliographic Info:

Title: Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type
Author: Doreen Cronin
Illustrator: Betsy Lewin
Reading level: Ages 3 and up
Hardcover: 32 pages
Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers; Reprint. edition (February 1, 2000)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0689832133
ISBN-13: 978-1416903482

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Author: Nessa

Librarian for people with visual and physical impairments, and mother of two sharp-witted alien children.

8 thoughts on “Perfect Picture Book: CLICK, CLACK, MOO”

  1. I think I’ve read CLICK, CLACK, MOO once a week for the last five years to my kids. When we moved to a farm last year and got two cows and a flock of chickens, my oldest joked about putting an old typewriter in the barn….just in case. 😉

  2. A typewriter is not ancient history — we still used them on newspapers and in offices until the late 70s, and in some cases into the 80s. Although most used electric typewriters, then word processors followed. You are all so young! LOL. Anyway, loved your review of this book Nessa. Sonds like fun!

    Nessa I don’t know why I didn’t think to publish my review of your book in uTales. Someone posted Erik’s review of some books on uTales today. Do you think it is too late? You had quite a few comments and about 160 views.

    1. Actually, we still use a type writer for some labels at our library. And, I remember typing my sixth grade presidential report on one. But I am ancient according to my kids…

      As for uTales, sure. It’s never too late. Thanks for thinking of that!

    1. …even more ancient than CDs. My daughter got a CD in a kids meal once. She couldn’t understand why it wouldn’t work in our DVD player.

      It’s fun getting older and seeing how the things I grew up with are completely foreign to my kids. My son was aghast when I explained that there was a time before the iPhone & we didn’t even have the “Internet” growing up.

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